Lesson Plan
Intelligence Types
Mind Style Types
Standards
 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES 
5 TYPES OF INTELLIGENCES ARE ADDRESSED IN THIS LESSON PLAN

INTER-PERSONAL 
Enable some students to practice their leadership and others to be collaborative. Q & A and commenting after presentations will encourage and formalize dialogue.

INTRA-PERSONAL
Kids love games and designing their own game will likely be an activity that allows them to role play in a kind of "Game Studio" fantasy where they will have a defined role to which they can attach their ego: the mathematician, the character designer, the world maker, etc.

LOGICAL/MATHEMATICAL
This is the if/then game logic design and scoring math.

LINGUISTIC
Students will create names, tag-lines and written stories and descriptions as well as make formal presentations to their class. 

MUSICAL
Students will plan and design the sounds that reflect the content in the game.



 ABOUT MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES 

 OVERVIEW: 

Harvard University Professor of Education, Howard Gardner

Gardner postulated in the early 80s that human intelligence can be broken into 7 types that work together to create a kind of Gestalt-like, individual intelligence for each of us. He recently added an 8th (Naturalist). Though Gardner himself did not refer to these explicitly as learning styles, many educators have interpreted them as such. In fact Gardner has explicitly rejected the term "learning styles" as an equivalent to Multiple Intelligences.

Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University

When engaging the human mind in educational settings, Kendall College of Art and Design's Art Education program believes that teachers need to be intentional in their curriculum and incorporate multi-sensory instruction as a means of diversification. Students record and retrieve information better when the stimuli and instruction of information is not only intentional but varied. Consideration of Dr. Gardner and Dr Gregorc's (see Mind Styles tab) higher levels of diversification.

Kendall professor Donna F. St John

" Educational progress should not be assessed by the amount of information that a student can process. Educational success should be measured as the astute ability to creatively synthesize seemingly disparate ideas in order to solve global problems in a collaborative way, with the realization that our entire existence is co-dependent."



 RESOURCES: 

GARDNER'S WEBSITE: MI OASIS
http://multipleintelligencesoasis.org
goes into great depth on the subject.

GARDNER'S BOOKS:
"Frames of Mind The Theory Of Multiple Intelligences"
"Multiple Intelligences: In Theory And Practice"
"Multiple Intelligences: The Theory In Practice"



 DEFINITIONS: 
FROM GARDNER

SPATIAL:

The ability to conceptualize and manipulate large-scale spatial arrays (e.g. airplane pilot, sailor), or more local forms of space (e.g. architect, chess player).


BODILY-KINESTHETIC:
The ability to use one’s whole body, or parts of the body (like the hands or the mouth), to solve problems or create products (e.g. dancer).


MUSICAL:
Sensitivity to rhythm, pitch, meter, tone, melody and timbre. May entail the ability to sing, play musical instruments, and/or compose music (e.g. musical conductor).


LINGUISTIC:
Sensitivity to the meaning of words, the order among words, and the sound, rhythms, inflections, and meter of words (e.g. poet). (Sometimes called language intelligence.)


LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL:
The capacity to conceptualize the logical relations among actions or symbols (e.g. mathematicians, scientists). Famed psychologist Jean Piaget believed he was studying the range of intelligences, but he was actually studying logical-mathematical intelligence.


INTERPERSONAL:
The ability to interact effectively with others. Sensitivity to others’ moods, feelings, temperaments and motivations (e.g. negotiator). (Sometimes called social intelligence.)


INTRAPERSONAL:
Sensitivity to one’s own feelings, goals, and anxieties, and the capacity to plan and act in light of one’s own traits. Intrapersonal intelligence is not particular to specific careers; rather, it is a goal for every individual in a complex modern society, where one has to make consequential decisions for oneself. (Sometimes called self intelligence.)


NATURALISTIC:
The ability to make consequential distinctions in the world of nature as, for example, between one plant and another, or one cloud formation and another (e.g. taxonomist). (Sometimes called nature intelligence.)